Gay conspiracy = equality

 

 

 

 

"I would think that is so long ago that we're seeing the outworkings of it decades down the line. And to say there's a conspiracy now is going to raise eyebrows, and (people will) say, 'Well, I don't think so. It's just the natural evolution.' "But there are things, like what we're talking about, that once you set in motion, it's like shoving a snowball off the edge of the barn roof. Once you set it in motion you don't have to keep pushing. It sort of keeps going. It's that slippery slope that we talk about."
Larry Spencer, Vancouver Sun, November 27, 2003

 

 

External link to THE AGENDA!

 

 

Spencer has helped to explain why a MP was attacked last weekend by someone who is against same-sex marriage, why we need sexual orientation included in hate laws, and why we must have equal marriage in place across Canada, from coast to coast to coast.

 

 

 

External link to GAYWORLD.COM

 

 

 

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Adovcacy News - Gay Conspiracy

November 27, 2003

Gay conspiracy: 40 years to equal marriage

"I just think it's so sad that we have to take an issue like this and be asked to put the Good Housekeeping seal of approval on it without being allowed to tell the truth and talk about facts ... Let's just say if ... anybody that used Colgate toothpaste, their life expectancy was lowered by 10, 15 years. What do you think would happen to Colgate toothpaste? It would be outlawed. Well, we know that's what happens to men living a gay lifestyle."
Larry Spencer, Alliance Party MP, Vancouver Sun, November 27, 2003


In 1996 Bob Ringma, a Member of Parliament from the Reform party, mentioned that he would send gay or black people to the back of the shop if customers didn't approve of them.

"Well, don't you think that an employer should have that sort of freedom that if someone's working for him and is responsible for his business failing that he should be able to say, hey, I don't need you in my employ or I'm going to switch you to the back of the shop ...", Ringma told a reporter from the Vancouver Sun in an Apr. 29, 1996 interview, published May 1, 1996.

The Reform party never quite recovered from its reputation for bigotry. It rebranded itself into the Canadian Alliance party, but that party too has earned a reputation for intolerance. Now, as the Alliance party is attempting to shed it's snakeskin again, it is hoping to acquire respectability through a merger with the Progressive Conservative party.

Today the spirit of the Reform/Alliance party seemed the same as ever. Capturing it all, once again, was the same Vancouver Sun reporter, Peter O'Neil, who reported Ringma's views in 1996.

The Gay Conspiracy

O'Neil recently saw an email that contained Member of Parliament Larry Spencer's opinion that an intricate and "well-orchestrated" gay conspiracy, spanning the past four decades, had finally led to the ultimate outcome, the "good housekeeping" seal of approval; same-sex marriage.

"The conspiracy included the seduction and recruitment of young boys in playgrounds and locker rooms and the deliberate infiltration of North America's judiciary, schools, the religious community, and the entertainment industry," the Vancouver Sun faithfully reported Spencer's summary.

Spencer's party leader, Stephen Harper, spouted other conspiracy theories in September risking never being taken seriously again. Spencer, although perhaps inspired by his leader, may have been referring to a satire from 1987 that has been redistributed by anti-gay sites as an example of "the homosexual agenda".

"Gay Revolutionary" was printed in Gay Community News, under a pseudonym, Michael Swift.

"We printed it thinking that it was sort of funny," said a former writer for the paper, Michael Bronski (The National Post, Nov. 28, 2003).

Spencer, apparently, was not amused. The MP expressed regret that Pierre Elliott Trudeau decriminalized homosexuality in 1969.

"I do believe it was a mistake to have legalized it," Spencer told the Vancouver Sun, adding that he would support a bill that reversed that decision. "If somebody brought a bill in the House to do that I'd certainly vote for it. Yeah, I'd like to see that [to] be the case."

A clear warning

Hours after the Vancouver Sun published the story, the Alliance MP was fired from his position as the party's family issues critic. But the statements continue to illustrate what is at stake in a merger of the Alliance and Progressive Conservative parties.

"Do you really want to be in bed, Peter [McKay, the current leader of the PC party] - you and your party - with this group of Neanderthals?" MP Svend Robinson asked on CBC television.

"This is clearly a warning to Progressive Conservatives who are thinking about folding up our progressive party and merging into something else because they think it might be more competitive," Joe Clark, past Prime Minister and former leader of the PCs, said in the same report from CBC.

Acceptance of the right to same-sex marriage has become a litmus test for politicians in Canada. It is proving a reliable test of viability for a merger between the Alliance and Progressive Conservative parties. Canadians will never make a party of bigots a viable force to run the country, which is, after all, the whole point of a merger between the two parties.

Good Housekeeping seal of approval or criminal record? Spencer's framing of the debate over same-sex marriage may be more extreme than some, but the spirit of his argument is familiar to many who have been enflamed by their political and spiritual leaders.

Spencer has helped to explain why a MP was attacked last weekend by someone who is against same-sex marriage, why we need sexual orientation included in hate laws, and why we must have equal marriage in place across Canada, from coast to coast to coast.


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